World Without Mines supports vital emergency Risk Education in South Sudan

The organisation World Without Mines (WWM) has granted 49,300 USD to facilitate DCA’s emergency Risk Education operations in South Sudan, that seeks to inform and educate the internally displaced people in the areas around the Northern border about the threats of the Explosive Remnants of War.

©DanChurchAid

Risk Education session in an internally displaced people (IDP) settlement in Upper Nile State, South Sudan.


The ethnic violence in South Sudan has since the beginning of the conflict killed thousands of people and over 1.4 million people have been internally displaced. Fighting around the states of Jonglei, Upper Nile and Unity has been particularly intense and tensions remain high as sporadic fighting in the area continues.
The internally displaced people (IDP) have gathered in small pockets alongside the host population in very rural areas of the Northern border, which makes it extremely difficult for humanitarian agencies to reach those positions.
Therefore, there is an urgent need for emergency Risk Education (RE) for the IDPs who are not familiar with the threats of Explosive Remnants of War (ERW) and do not have good knowledge about the areas they are going to or passing through.
The grant from WWM allows DCA to send emergency response teams to the rural areas to prepare the IPDs for what they might find when they return home, or if they move on to another location.
They will learn about what unexploded and abandoned ordnances might look like, how they should avoid them, report them, and protect others in the community from them.
Furthermore, with the grant from WWM, DCA will provide Community Focal Point training to selected members of the community, who will be able to provide peer-to-peer training to those who are most at risk, but unable to attend the direct RE sessions provided by DCA. This way the safety messages continues to be shared even when the project ends.
The project starts the 1st of March and has a duration of six months.